Measuring Opening Pressure & Intracranial Pressure

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CSF Leak Association Factsheet Series Advert - Opening Pressure on Lumbar Puncture

Measuring lumbar puncture opening pressure is common practice during spontaneous CSF leak and intracranial hypertension investigation and diagnosis. Less common, but still widely used at some institutions is the practice of looking out for low intracranial pressure via ICP monitoring.

Both confirmed and potential CSF leak sufferers often query how pressure is measured, the differences between opening pressure and intracranial pressure recording, and what ranges constitute normal, low and high pressure. In response, we’ve produced a CSF leak-specific factsheet.

Our updated factsheet explores the key ins/outs of measuring opening pressure by lumbar puncture and provides details on the common pressure ranges in tabulated form. Also covered are the basics of CSF production and absorption.

We have updated the factsheet in response to feedback and also referenced a number of new and additional journal articles, including two important publications which confirm that ‘normal’ opening pressure is not an uncommon occurrence with spontaneous CSF leaks.

Download the factsheet here: Measuring Opening Pressure & Intracranial Pressure

Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks: An Overview

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We are delighted to announce the publication of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks: An Overview, the latest edition to our popular factsheet series. It is free to download from our website.

This new leaflet provides a valuable overview of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) csf-leak-association-factsheet-series-advert-csf-leaks-an-overviewleaks, both cranial and spinal, and touches upon key signs and symptoms, diagnostic techniques and treatment options.

It has been produced in consultation with two UK neurologists working in the NHS: Dr Simon Ellis, a consultant neurologist at Royal Stoke University Hospital, and Dr Manjit Matharu, a consultant neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks: An Overview is a must-read for both diagnosed sufferers and those who suspect that they may be suffering from a CSF leak. It is ideal for inclusion in leaflet displays or handing out as part of an awareness-raising event.

The leaflet also provides useful information for GPs, doctors working in emergency medicine, paramedics and other healthcare professionals who may not routinely encounter CSF leaks in their work, but nonetheless need to know what to look out for and how to treat them.

Download the leaflet here: Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks - An Overview

Measuring Opening Pressure on Lumbar Puncture

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CSF Leak Association Factsheet Series Advert - Opening Pressure on Lumbar Puncture

Measuring lumbar puncture opening pressure is common practice during CSF leak and spontaneous intracranial hypertension diagnosis.

Many confirmed or potential CSF leak sufferers often query how pressure is measured, the differences between opening pressure and intracranial pressure recording, and what ranges constitute normal, low and high pressure.

Our new factsheet explores the key ins/outs of measuring opening pressure by lumbar puncture and provides details on the common pressure ranges in tabulated form. Also covered are the basics of CSF production and absorption.

The importance of using non-cutting needles for lumbar puncture procedures, in order to reduce the risk of post-dural puncture headache and persistent CSF leak, is also highlighted.

Download the factsheet here: Measuring Opening Pressure & Intracranial Pressure

Headache Journal: Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Leaks

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Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks typically present with orthostatic headaches. Less commonly, spontaneous CSF leaks can present with other headache types. Nausea, vomiting, hearing disturbances, diplopia, back pain, and dizziness are not uncommon associated symptoms. Although the exact cause of CSF leaks often remains uncertain, some patients may be predisposed due to disorders of connective tissue or spinal meningeal anomalies.

When a spontaneous CSF leak is suspected, head MRI with contrast is ordinarily the first study to obtain. Common abnormalities seen include diffuse dural enhancement, subdural fluid collections, engorged cerebral venous sinuses, and cerebral descent. Important to know is the fact that despite typical clinical features, head MRI may occasionally be unremarkable. In such situations, ancillary studies may help answer whether a CSF leak is present. Radioisotope cisternography and spine MRI are helpful tools in such occurrences. Presently, CT-myelography remains the most reliable test to find the exact spinal CSF leak site. Often, however, the exact CSF leak site is not found.

Read the full article here: http://www.headachejournal.org/view/0/CSFLeaks.html