Headache Journal: Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Leaks

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Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks typically present with orthostatic headaches. Less commonly, spontaneous CSF leaks can present with other headache types. Nausea, vomiting, hearing disturbances, diplopia, back pain, and dizziness are not uncommon associated symptoms. Although the exact cause of CSF leaks often remains uncertain, some patients may be predisposed due to disorders of connective tissue or spinal meningeal anomalies.

When a spontaneous CSF leak is suspected, head MRI with contrast is ordinarily the first study to obtain. Common abnormalities seen include diffuse dural enhancement, subdural fluid collections, engorged cerebral venous sinuses, and cerebral descent. Important to know is the fact that despite typical clinical features, head MRI may occasionally be unremarkable. In such situations, ancillary studies may help answer whether a CSF leak is present. Radioisotope cisternography and spine MRI are helpful tools in such occurrences. Presently, CT-myelography remains the most reliable test to find the exact spinal CSF leak site. Often, however, the exact CSF leak site is not found.

Read the full article here: http://www.headachejournal.org/view/0/CSFLeaks.html

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